A NEW BEGINNING . . .

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I know , I know. New beginning is redundant . . . but I like the way it reads, just bear with me.

I remember reading the futuristic sci-fi mysteries ( I read everything I could lay my hands on ) that belonged to my big brother Kenneth ( he was an avid reader ). And the year the story took place would be 2000 something. The date alone, 2000, made for scary fiction back then.

In 1957 talking about the year 2000 was something my young brain couldn’t even grasp. Wow, that was way into the future.

But here I sit, enjoying my habitual morning coffee, on the first day of the new year, 2016. And I feel like I’ve been catapulted from 1957 into 2016. It seems like  it happened that quickly!

On the first day of each new year, as a rule, in a melancholy mood, I sift through events and happenings of the year that’s just flown past. I experience pretty much the same emotions each year and in much the same order—they are as follows:

  • Wonder and awe at the swiftness of time.
  • A bittersweet sadness for times past.
  • The creeping in of yet unspoken goals.
  • A spark of excitement for what the new year may bring.

The last on my list, that spark of excitement, is the one I’m thankful for. I’m indeed grateful that I still get excited for the year ahead—whatever it might bring!

My wish for you, friends, family and readers, is that you, too, get excited for the year ahead. Set goals. Expect success and good results. Know that if—no, not if, but when things sometimes go wrong, you don’t  buckle under—you buckle up and push harder, or redirect—whichever is needed to keep you on track with your goals. From my home to yours, I wish you much success and good fortune in 2016!

Happy New Year!

Keep God first in your goals and plans, He’s on your side. Until next time—signing off with a :-), Mare

Leaning on The Rail.

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How often do we find ourselves leaning on a fence rail, or looking out the window, maybe even sitting on the patio and taking a break. Any of those places provide a perfect place and time to wonder about things. Things like the future, the scenery before us, or more likely, a task that’s proving difficult to get finished.

Or maybe we’re just . . . leaning on the rail.

Every time I see this photo, I focus on the dreamy quality of the setting. The model’s seemingly relaxed gaze across the beautiful fall landscape could be misleading. The scene might make me wonder what interesting thoughts this person would be having in this serene setting.

  • I can picture a sadness because she’s waiting for someone who may not return.
  • I can see a woman walking to a neighbor’s house and paused to enjoy the smell of fall. She’ll describe it to her friend later.
  • I can see an artist searching for the perfect spot to paint from. There’s so much to choose from!

Only, I know the model, and her thoughts were none of the above.

My sister and I had been to an auction, and we were both very tired. But I had my camera with me—and I love old falling down fences with peeling paint. Especially old fences with rustic red peeling paint.

I made Ruth, my sister, go stand by the fence. She complained that she looked awful and she didn’t want her picture made. She didn’t look awful, but I compromised and said she could stand with her back to me—I just wanted a figure by the fence.

My point is that many times what a thing looks like and what it actually is, can be worlds apart. The next time an image makes you wonder what’s going on in the scene, pause for a moment, and try to imagine three completely different scenarios to fit the image.

It’s fun. And for the writer it stirs the imagination.

I was pretty sure that what Ruthy was thinking was far different from the dreamy image I wanted to depict to my viewers.

I hurried the shot. 🙂

Until next time,

Mare 🙂

Keep God first in your plans, things work out better.